Spirit of Springhill: Miners, Wives, Widows, Rescuers & Their Children Tell True Stories of Springhill’s Coal Mining Disasters

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My grandfather survived one of the biggest disasters in coal mining history. I’ve been working on a project about Springhill, Nova Scotia for a long time based on what I learned about what happened to him and many other good men of Springhill. I wrote a screenplay called Song of Springhill, a dramatized version of the Springhill Mine Disasters. I am also currently penning the novel version.

In the process of researching the story, I got the chance to talk to many wonderful people related to the disasters: miners who were miraculously rescued, their wives and kids, widows and children of those who were lost in the mines, and rescue workers. I’m releasing this book of interviews separately now while I’m still working on the novel.

Spirit of Springhill is written in honor of this special town, and contains interviews with 16 men and women. It’s 132 pages. Special thanks to all who were willing to share their stories for this book and for the ways their stories have helped me work on the novel and screenplay. I’m honored to have met these wonderful people, some of whom have passed away since I interviewed them. My hope is this book is a way to share their legacies for generations to come.

Spirit of Springhill is now available as a Paperback or an Ebook for Kindles, tablets, phones and computers. If you don’t have a Kindle, all you need is the free Amazon Kindle Reader software for your phone, tablet or computer to read it instantly.  The ordering instructions for Paperback and Ebook are different, depending on if you’re in Canada or the United States.

 Canada Residents:

You can purchase the Paperback version from the following link to Cheryl’s Bookstore on Createspace: (Createspace is a division of Amazon.com that will send the book to Canada. You will need to create an account with them separate from your Amazon.ca account.)

Click Here to Buy Spirit of Springhill in Paperback from Cheryl’s Createspace Store

If you buy one copy of the book ($10), it’s approximately 6.99 shipping. Duties and Taxes might not be collected at time of purchase but may be due upon receipt. If you buy copies of the book in bulk, shipping is less per book. (Example: 10 copies = approx. 2.09 shipping per book.) For any stores or museums in Springhill that would like to stock the book for purchase by others, contact the author for a bulk discount code before ordering: cheryl@purplepenworks.com

The Ebook version is available on Amazon.ca in Canada:

Click Here to Buy Spirit of Springhill in Ebook Format from Amazon.ca

For U.S. orders, use the following links:

Spirit of Springhill (PAPERBACK VERSION)

Spirit of Springhill (KINDLE VERSION)

All other countries, check your country’s Amazon site for the Ebook. It may be a couple of months before the Paperback may potentially show up.

I hope you are as inspired as I have been by the spirit of this special town that refused to give up on any of its own people, and the miraculous rescues that followed. I will continue to press forward with the novel version and announce once that is ready.

 

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How to use Pinterest for Inspiration as a Writer

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I only recently starting using Pinterest. When I first heard, “You should be on Pinterest,” I groaned. Just what I need. Another social media site to kill time on. I’m already on Facebook, Twitter (which I am NOT a fan of using), and my blogs. Why add another thing to my plate? But very quickly, it won me over. Besides the beautiful photos from all over the world, I found another use that has really helped inspire my writing.

Whenever I take on a new project, I enjoy finding pictures that go with the locations, props, costumes / wardrobe, etc of the time period or era I’m writing about. If it’s a modern day story, even just finding locations for where the movie version could shoot has been fun and helped me with descriptions.

For example, when writing my most recent romantic-comedy screenplay, Love’s a Stage, I used Pinterest to find all sorts of Thanksgiving wedding decoration ideas. I didn’t necessarily want to have a Thanksgiving wedding board on my page, so I didn’t pin them to any particular board. But as a resource, the visuals I found were very inspiring as I wrote those scenes.  I did make a colonial board for that story to go along with some of the pilgrim research in the story.

Pinterest Board for Love’s a Stage

Pinterest can be especially helpful when you are researching  a particular industry or time period. I made 2 boards while working on Song of Springhill. (It’s already a screenplay but is currently in the works as a novel.) One is about the location and mining industry. The other is about the era, the 1950s.

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Pinterest Board for Song of Springhill

The 1950s Pinterest Board

I did a lot of Danish research for a current project, looking at Denmark, Solvang, CA, Elk Horn, IA, and everything from locations to food, outfits, and shoes. Making that board made me so excited about writing the project.

windmill

Pinterest Board for Windmill Falls

While Pinterest didn’t exist yet when I first starting writing the screenplay version of Never the Bride (or the novel), I’ve been able to use it while the script version is in development to be shot as a film, and will be able to use it for inspiration when penning its sequel, Forever the One.

NTB Final Movie Poster

Pinterest Board for Never the Bride: the movie

A Word about using Pinterest to Market Yourself as Writer

It’s often suggested that we, as writers, make our Pinterest boards in a way that can have some appeal to others who are interested in a particular topic. Most boards shouldn’t just be dedicated to a particular book or project in a way that may not appeal to others.  So it’s suggested you choose a category for your board that has a broad appeal topically if you are hoping this board will bring awareness to you and your projects (books, movies, etc). Some projects may warrant their own board (like we chose to do with the Never the Bride board.) But the other boards, like the one for Windmill Falls or Love’s a Stage, I went with broader categories like Danish Living and All About Colonial. That way, those interested in those topics will follow the board.

For my non-fiction projects, instead of doing a board that is just for my books Finally Fearless: Journey from Panic to Peace or Finally the Bride: Finding Hope While Waiting, I chose to make boards with broader topics, like:

Find Freedom from Fear

&

Hope For Singles

Remember: in using Pinterest as a writer, it’s not just about selling books or DVDs. It’s about connecting with people, your readers and viewers, and giving them something that is useful to them just by visiting your page (or your blog if your Pinterest pins also link to a particular blog like this one).

Follow me on Pinterest

Click Here to Learn More about my Books & Movies

Now, go make your writing more Pinspiring!

Ripple Effect of Life

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I don’t even know how to begin this blog, this delicate story on my heart. There’s a story I’ve wanted to tell for years. It’s inspired by actual events from my own family. (And for once, no, it has nothing to do with how long it took God to write my love story, as shared through my books Never the Bride: a novel and Finally the Bride: Finding Hope While Waiting.) It’s more in line with the themes of my feature film, The Ultimate Gift: legacies and what we do with the time we have, and the gift one day of life brings to us.

This story is about my history, its roots, and how the ripple effect of events are why I am here today, why I was able to be born.

But this story also meant the death of someone else. That is sobering.

In fact, without death and the multiple tragedies reflected in this story, I wouldn’t be here today. I wouldn’t have been able to be born into the family I was born into.

Have you ever pondered the events that brought you to this earth? Have you ever asked yourself the question, “How was I born into my particular family? Why am I here? What was I meant to do?”

Many years ago, my father told me we should try to do a film about my grandfather’s life as a miner in Springhill, Nova Scotia.  It took me a while to listen to him. Eventually, I woke up to this amazing town and the balance between tragedies and extraordinary miracles this place experienced! It’s one of those tiny towns that, in the 1950s, when tragedy struck multiple times, the entire world stopped and watched. Waited. Waited for good news, hoping for miracles, hoping for news of lives saved.

This place, its stories, and my grandfather’s life there, were all the inspiration for my screenplay, Song of Springhill, which I am currently adapting into a novel. (To be released in Spring 2014.)

My grandfather, Charles Hugh McKay—also known as “Dado” to his grandchildren—died when I was fifteen years old. I wish, when I was younger, I had been more interested in asking him questions about his life as a miner, and the miracles that spared his life. It wasn’t something he voluntarily talked about when not asked. I embarked on a quest to get to know more about what his life was like after he was gone. I wish I had taken better advantage of the time I had with him.

His first mining accident was in the 1940s, and contributed to him not having to go off to war because he suffered a broken pelvis. A rail car ran over him in the mines; it took him months to recover. There are stories surrounding two of Springhill’s biggest disasters, the 1956 Explosion and the 1958 Bump, that also affected my grandfather’s life.

My aunt, Joyce Harroun, told me of a story relating to the 1956 Explosion. The way she remembers it, her father (my grandfather) switched shifts that day with another man. The man wanted to go hunting during the day, and asked my grandfather if he’d work the day shift for him, and upon his return, the man would work my grandfather’s afternoon shift.

Because of this shift, “Dado” got off work just a couple hours before the mine blew up. His life was spared, but the man who switched shifts with him died. They had the same job working in the same spot by the rail cars.

It also meant that the team of men my grandfather was used to working with died that day too; he lost a lot of his friends. As my Aunt shares, it was the only time she ever saw my grandfather cry up until that point in his life.

When interviewing one of the survivors of the Explosion, this survivor supplied two names of those who had the same job as my grandfather. Both of them were killed in the Explosion. I found an article in the Halifax Chronicle that seemed to back up the story my Aunt told. It mentioned one of their names as one who was “working an extra shift for a friend” that day, implying he wouldn’t normally have been underground.

Despite the dangers, my grandfather continued to work underground. Then in 1958, he was trapped underground when one of the biggest disasters in coal mining history hit:  The Bump. October 23, 1958.

My father anxiously waited for news of whether or not his dad was still alive, from the Lamp Cabin, a place where miners turned in their lamps when they finished their shifts. His father’s check number, #712, remained on the board, showing he had not yet surfaced. Not yet picked up his check tag.

Once the earliest miners were rescued, my grandfather was the third person to walk through that Lamp Cabin door. The first face he saw was my dad’s fourteen-year-old face, waiting for him, hoping and praying he was still alive. Seventy-five men died in that disaster.

After the rescue, “Dado” vowed to never go underground again.  That meant he needed to find new work to support his family. This led him to take a new job and move his family to the Boston area. This move is how my father eventually met my mother, when she was an attractive 16 year old, a spunky Massachusetts girl that he was set up with on a blind date.

This blind date never would have happened if my grandfather had not been spared by the 1956 Explosion or survived the 1958 Bump, the tragedy that made him decide to leave his life of mining. My father has said, unequivocally, he would have had no reason to leave Canada had he not been moved to the United States with his father’s career change.

My parents have been married since 1966.  It’s ironic to me to think that this disaster (and the fact that “Dado’s” life was spared 10 years before that time) is the catalyst that brought me to this earth.

At the same time, it’s sobering. I ponder the family who lost their husband / father / son because of the innocent desire this man had to go hunting that day. November 1, 1956.  I ponder what he must have missed out on, dying so young. How those in his family must have questioned over the years “what if?”

This story helps me connect specific dots that allowed me to enter the scene. It makes me ponder why I am here and encourages me to want to make the most of the life I am given and do at least a little bit of good while I am here. It reminds me of how we are not promised any particular amount of days. I hope anyone reading this will be encouraged to make an impact with their lives, no matter how long they are blessed to be on this earth.

Any ideas for how you’d like to change the world?  Your family? Or even just the life of one person?  You never know when that may have a ripple effect on the lives of many others.

Springhill, Nova Scotia Pinterest Board

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Some photos of the book author with Springhillers:

Caleb Rushton Miracle SurvivorCheryl with Caleb Rushton and his wife Pat (He was a miracle survivor of the 1958 Bump, after being trapped for 6 days)

Dr. Arnold Burden heroCheryl with Arnold Burden, a doctor/ rescuer for both the 1956 Explosion and the 1958 Bump

Herb Pepperdine Miracle SurvivorCheryl with Herb Pepperdine, miracle survivor of the 1958 Bump

Norma Ruddick Singing Miners WifeNorma Ruddick, wife of the “Singing Miner”, Maurice Ruddick, a miracle survivor who was rescued after 8 1/2 days underground.

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NOW AVAILABLE:

Spirit of Springhill: Miners, Widows, Orphans, Rescuers and Children Tell True Stories of Springhill’s Coal Mining Disasters (A Book of Interviews with People of Springhill)

Spirit of Springhill (PAPERBACK VERSION)

Spirit of Springhill (KINDLE VERSION)

For Canadian Citizens:

Click Here to Buy Spirit of Springhill in Paperback from Cheryl’s Createspace Store

Click Here to Buy Spirit of Springhill in Ebook Format from Amazon.ca

COMING 2014:

 

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